5 Southern Wedding Traditions Any Couple Can Incorporate

5 Southern Wedding Traditions Any Couple Can Incorporate

You might remember when we first went behind the scenes with the ladies of Southern Weddings and fell in love with bright, sunny office space and impeccable sense of style. Lucky for us, they’re popping back today to share a few time-honored Southern traditions to incorporate into your wedding – whether your big day falls below the Mason-Dixon line or not.

From the Southern Weddings gals… Hi friends! We’re thrilled to be here on Style Me Pretty today chatting about one of our favorite topics: traditions! Though we specifically love to focus on wedding traditions that originated in the South, we’ve been tickled pink to see these Southern wedding traditions increase in popularity around the world. (Kind of like all things Southern right now: any Fixer Upper fans out there? :)) Whether you’re a Southern bride or not, consider adding one of these sweet traditions to your wedding day for an extra dose of charm!

Burying the bourbon

Legend has it that if a couple buries a full bottle of bourbon upside down one month before their wedding day at the location where they’ll say “I do,” they’ll be blessed with sunny skies on the big day. After covering up the bottle, don’t forget to mark the spot, as it should be dug up and enjoyed with the wedding party on the wedding day (usually after the ceremony), making this a win-win tradition, no matter the skies!

See the full wedding here!

The second line

Leave it to New Orleans, where the motto is laissez les bons temps rouler, to be the birthplace of one of the most lively and fun Southern wedding traditions! The second line stems from an old tradition at African-American jazz funerals, where a brass band paraded to honor the life of the deceased while loved ones followed the band, dancing to add to the spirit and celebration of the procession.

Weddings with a NOLA connection have flipped this tradition on its head, using a second line parade to signify the beginning of new life for the bride and groom. A second line usually takes place between the ceremony and reception, with the newly married couple leading the way, and a brass band and wedding party following right behind. Though second lines begin with just invited guests, they often attract passers-by to join the fun! Make sure to pick up a black parasol for the groom, a white parasol for the bride, and handkerchiefs for each guest to wave.

See the full wedding here!

A house party

Only so many bridesmaids can fit at the front of a church! But what to do if you can’t bear to leave any of your best girls out? Enter the house party—the South’s answer to big extended families, sororities, and more. Members of a house party are often assigned wedding day tasks, such as passing out programs or helping the bride get ready, and are invited to the bachelorette party and bridal showers. The only thing a house party traditionally does not do is stand at the altar with the bride–that spot is reserved for bridesmaids. HP gals can be seated in the first or second row, just behind family.

As for outfitting your house party, you have some options! For a more formal, coordinated look, some brides choose the same dress for all of the HP gals, in a color that’s different but complementary to the color of the bridesmaid dresses. Another popular option is to ask the house party to wear little black dresses, since most girls will already have an option or two in their closets. Finally, you can simply tell the house party your wedding color scheme and ask them to dress in something that coordinates.

See the full wedding here!

The cake pull

If you’re looking for a fun and sweet activity for your bridesmaids’ luncheon or bridal shower, try the cake pull! It hails from the Victoria days, when charms of luck and good fortune (and sometimes not-so-good fortune) were set into the wedding cake by the bride to predict the future of her single friends. These days, pulls are often placed in a small cake at a pre-wedding get together, and bridesmaids and close female friends (not only singles!) are given the opportunity to pull a charm from the cake just before it’s cut. A few of our favorite charms and their meanings: a hot-air balloon (adventure and travel), the fleur de lis (love and prosperity), the four-leaf clover (good luck), and a diamond ring (next to be married!).

See the full wedding here!

The groom’s cake

While many wedding details err on the feminine side, a groom’s cake is a fun and (literally) sweet way to do something extra special just for the gent of honor! Collaborate with your baker to get creative and surprise your beau with a cake that reflects his hobbies, favorite sports team, occupation, or alma mater, to be served alongside the wedding cake at the reception. Or, try a “cake” that isn’t a cake at all — instead, set out a tower of Oreos, a stack of doughnuts, or trays of his favorite childhood treats. Or, if he’s a Southern boy through and through, go with the classic: a bleedin’ armadillo cake, just like the one in Steel Magnolias.

See the full wedding here!

Looking for more details on Southern wedding traditions, and wedding traditions in general? We’ve got lots more details and ideas in our e-book, All About Southern Wedding Traditions. And now, we’d love to hear: what traditions did you include, or are you planning to include, in your wedding?

xo, the Southern Weddings gals

Photography (in order): Anna Shackleford | Arte De Vie | Eric Kelley Photography | Amy Arrington Photography | Greer Gattuso

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5 Southern Wedding Traditions Any Couple Can Incorporate
Source: Style Me Pretty Blog

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